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Blog - August 2016

AEBC/CCB Joint National Conference Call: NNELS Detailed Notes, July 27, 2016

August 31, 2016

(The following are detailed notes from the CCB and AEBC National Call which took place on July 27, 2016)

Dear program supporters,

On July 27, 2016, we held the national conference call regarding library services. The national conference call was sponsored by the Canadian Council of the Blind’s Get Together with Technology Program (GTT) and AEBC’s Accessible Information and Copyright Committee

The topic of the call was “Canadian Library Services: Who provides it, what do they provide, how does it work and what does the future look like?” Mr. Leo Bissonnette, AEBC National Board Member, and Mr.

AEBC/CCB National Conference Call: CELA Detailed Notes, July 27, 2016

August 31, 2016

(The following are detailed notes from the CCB and AEBC National Call which took place on July 27, 2016)

Dear program supporters,

On July 27, 2016, we held the national conference call regarding library services.

Imagine

It was a warm and sunny spring day in June 2016 in Ottawa as I made my way to the centre Block on Parliament Hill high above the Ottawa River. Crowned by The Peace Tower, it is gothic revival architecture that both memorializes our past as a young and evolving parliamentary democracy and marks our path to a modern digital future with the means to enable all of us.

The sound of voices in the cavernous Centre Block Rotunda makes me feel so small, yet still significant… simply because I am there and open to all that unites us to each other.

Human rights vs accessibility legislation: One does not equal the other

While the aims of human rights legislation such as Ontario's Human Rights Code may seem to be aligned with those of accessibility-specific legislation such as the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, the reality is that these are two very different schemes. While a violation of one may well be a violation of the other, this does not necessarily mean that complaints under both can be addressed together, or that the Human Rights Tribunal will give any credence to violations of the AODA.

A recently reported case from the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario (Clipperton-Boyer v McDonalds Restaurants of Canada Limited, 2016 HRTO 967 (CanLII)) makes two points that advocates must bear in mind when pursuing matters through the Tribunal.

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