You are here:

Advocacy

Hands Off Our Harnesses

What is “Hands Off Our Harnesses”?

The Canadian General Standards Board has drafted a set of standards which, if implemented, would impose conditions on the training and use of service dogs. The standard includes guide dogs which are dogs for the blind and visually impaired, and are therefore, by definition, not merely service dogs.

Further, the content of the standard is inconsistent with the use and training of guide dogs. Many Canadians get their guide dogs from the United States, and both American and Canadian schools find these standards at odds with standard training and use of guide dogs. American schools are concerned that, if these standards are accepted, they may stop accepting Canadian applicants.

Recognize Deafblindness as a single disability: Open Your Eyes and Ears

Introduction

Deafblindness is a unique disability, which requires a unique approach to support and a unique system to deliver that support.

At the Twelfth World Conference in Portugal (1999), Deafblind International (DBI), agreed to pass a resolution to appeal to governments around the world to use the following definition: “Deafblindness is a combination of visual impairment and hearing impairment.” Recognition for a common definition should be included in legislation and acknowledge the particular needs of individuals who are deafblind.

DeafBlind Ontario Services calls for official recognition of deafblindness as a distinct disability with equal rights and opportunities for individuals living with deafblindness in Canada.

Bill C33 failing Canadians who are blind

How many times do Canadians have to request a secret vote? I have known for many years that the way Canada provides people who are blind to mark a ballot is not adequate. The fact that we can't see, should make it easy for government officials to understand that if we have a special template to put our ballot into, with tactile areas to place our X in, we can't see if the ballot moved, thereby making our ballot void. Why is it that our federal government will not bring a way of voting that allows for a private secret secure vote? I am deaf-blind. Please try to view this bill from the perspective of Canadians who wish to vote in secret and with dignity.

Technology is used extensively by both the government and candidates during the time leading up to the vote.

Proud to be blind

Is the idea of being proud of yourself new to you? How about being proud of the fact that you have a disability or that you can eat anything without getting sick?

I share with you that I am very proud of who I am, and that I am deaf-blind. The fact that I was born blind, and that I have never let that fact stop me from doing what I want, is a part of who I am, and who I intend to always be. It wasn't easy to learn to live with deafness, but I have succeeded very well. I am an active senior citizen that is proud of being one of few people who is totally blind and deaf. I can do several things well I know what it is to have patience and to persist. I have experienced many hard times and come away with more pride in myself. No one will ever take that from me.

Being the Object of Prayer

If you’re blind, you’re no stranger to the experience of having a religious zealot approach you to tell you that they’re going to pray for you, and that God will listen to their prayers, and give you your sight back. Such encounters used to irritate the hell out of me, but no longer. As someone who starts off with a deep theoretical interest in religion and its expression, I’ve come to view these experiences as an opportunity for a little informal research, and scope for entertainment.

AEBC/CCB Joint National Conference Call: NNELS Detailed Notes, July 27, 2016

August 31, 2016

(The following are detailed notes from the CCB and AEBC National Call which took place on July 27, 2016)

Dear program supporters,

On July 27, 2016, we held the national conference call regarding library services. The national conference call was sponsored by the Canadian Council of the Blind’s Get Together with Technology Program (GTT) and AEBC’s Accessible Information and Copyright Committee

The topic of the call was “Canadian Library Services: Who provides it, what do they provide, how does it work and what does the future look like?” Mr. Leo Bissonnette, AEBC National Board Member, and Mr.

Non-Consensual Touching Seems to Depend On Who's Being Touched

I place the highest value on the impulse to help. One of my favourite things about my neighbourhood is that people ask me if I need help all the time. It never ever irritates me; it makes me happy. 19 times out of 20 I don’t, and I decline with a friendly word of thanks. In many other parts of the city however, I’m regularly physically accosted by well-meaning busybodies who haven’t learned to use their words. It’s not just me of course; most other blind people I know have the same problem. There’s a depressing distance between the good intentions of strangers who grab me on the street or in the subway, assuming I need help when I don’t, and the anger I often feel at being touched without consent.

People want to help. People want to make my unimaginable life a little easier.

Live Audio Description: What's Really Going On

I feel very fortunate to have the luxury of being an audio description snob. Now, if a movie or TV show doesn’t offer AD, I think three times about whether I want to bother with it. But audio description isn’t just for the movie theater or TV anymore. Increasingly, it’s becoming possible for blind and visually impaired people do access description for a wider range of cultural experiences like stage productions, art and museum exhibits, and sporting events. Recently, I had the chance to experience some live audio description that expanded my perception of my home city.

I like living in a city, especially one as diverse as Toronto. That said, I think of my affection mostly in practical terms: where can I go? What can I do? Who can I meet?

AEBC Ottawa Chapter meeting with City of Ottawa on transportation issues

On Dec 7 2015, the Ottawa Chapter of the AEBC hosted a very informative and successful first meeting with the city. 3 Representatives of the city (Tom, Randy, and Phil), joined a group of approximately 20 community members along with the Chapter Board to review and explore topics of mutual interest. Unfortunately, representation was not present from the Light Rail Transport (LRT) or customer Service areas and it is hoped this will be rectified in the summer 2016 meeting.

Discussions included bus announcements, universal design, the current LRT construction, installation of pulsing and audible lights, roundabouts, and the increased presence of bike lanes within the CITY.

Last Day of Campaign... (#IAmYourCustomer)

As we move into the last day of the campaign, you still have time to do your part and make a difference.

It is time to get involved and change the story about who we are. If you do not want others advocating on our behalf then it is up to all of us to advocate on matters of importance, such as access to vital information to support decision making.

Go to our home page and you will find supporting documentation there for the 'I Am Your Customer' and join us in making good things happen: http://www.blindcanadians.ca/iamyourcustomer

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Advocacy