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Guide Dogs

Hands Off Our Harnesses

What is “Hands Off Our Harnesses”?

The Canadian General Standards Board has drafted a set of standards which, if implemented, would impose conditions on the training and use of service dogs. The standard includes guide dogs which are dogs for the blind and visually impaired, and are therefore, by definition, not merely service dogs.

Further, the content of the standard is inconsistent with the use and training of guide dogs. Many Canadians get their guide dogs from the United States, and both American and Canadian schools find these standards at odds with standard training and use of guide dogs. American schools are concerned that, if these standards are accepted, they may stop accepting Canadian applicants.

Over The Rainbow Bridge - A Celebration of life for Nayttor Tayttor (November 22, 2002 - August 21, 2015)

This was written by Nate and Louise Johnson.

I was born on November 22, 2002 at GDB California Campus. I joined my puppy family in February of 2003, and enjoyed my time there. I was very well loved and learned a lot with my puppy family.

I arrived back at GDB's California Campus for my formal training in February 2004. My trainer was Darren Walsh who was an apprentice at that time. I learned slowly, but I never forgot what I learned. My training at GDB was longer than other guides. I became ready for class when I understood what was required of me, as a guide dog.

The first time I was partnered in class, it didn’t work out for the two of us. I went back to the kennels to wait for my perfect match.

Shack Whacky

I woke up this morning to a wind chill of minus 32 degrees. Didn’t we just do this two weeks ago? This is my second winter with Hope, my second dog guide and I am sure we only missed two days of walking last winter. We seem to miss two days every week lately. When she is limping after our first venture out for the morning relief, I know we are not walking that day. When I swear aloud during our first venture out, I know we are not walking anywhere that day. I am officially becoming “shack whacky”.

Blind sex offender skips jail: Corrections cannot accommodate blind prisoners

The accused, blind since the age of 16 as a result of a car accident, worked with the City of Calgary as a spokesperson and presenter on issues of blindness and disability. He has represented Canada at the Paralympic Games in 1984 and 1992. (By my reckoning, he must be at least in his 40's as a result.)

The accused, who has a prior criminal record for fraud over $5000, was convicted in 2012 of assault and sexual assault involving a friend. The question of sentencing -- and whether it would be proper for the accused to "be sentenced to a period of incarceration in a correctional facility given that he is blind and requires 24 hour assistance from his guide dog" -- was considered by a judge of the Alberta Provincial Court in April of this year: [R. v.

Please Don't Say Shh!

On Canada Day of 2005, I had the opportunity to help residents of a local nursing-home celebrate the occasion by providing background piano music while they feasted on cupcakes and punch. What I didn’t know until later was that a little boy and his mother were present as well.

When the child showed an interest in the dog attached to the piano leg, a friend, who worked there at the time as an Activities Co-ordinator, explained that the lady playing the piano was blind, and that the dog was actually a guide dog.

“Really?” He asked with growing interest. “Is she related to Ray Charles?”

The mother instantly felt the need to launch into damage control.

“Shh!” she admonished.

“But is she?” the young lad insisted.

“Be quiet!” his mother hissed.

What did I learn today - Remember to play!

Last night I was reminded of the joy that play can bring.  

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